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  • Data Center Monitoring: Raised Temperatures, Riskier Management

    Data Center Temperature Monitoring: Raised Temperatures, Riskier Management

    In 2008, American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) published new environmental guidelines for datacom equipment. They increased the high-end temperature from 77°F to 80.6°F.

    The guideline chart below shows the changes in more details:

    data center guideline chart

    According to the 2008 guideline, the recommended operating environments could not ensure optimum energy efficiency. There are varying degrees of energy efficiency within the recommended zone, depending on the outdoor temperature and the cooling system design. Thus, the guideline suggests, “it is incumbent upon each data center operator to review and determine, with appropriate engineering expertise, the ideal point for their system”.

    Patrick Thibodeau, reporter at computerworld.com, conducted an interview with Roger Schmidt, the IBM chief engineer for data center energy efficiency, about how the new temperature parameters will influence energy savings and data center cooling. When asked “how much heat can servers handle before they run into trouble”, Schmidt replied:

    “The previous guidelines for inlet conditions into server and storage racks was recommended at 68 degrees Fahrenheit to 77 Fahrenheit. This is where the IT industry feels that if you run at those conditions you will have reliable equipment for long periods of time. There is an allowable limit that is much bigger, from 59 degrees Fahrenheit to 89 degrees. That means that IT equipment will operate in that range, but if you run at the extremes of that range for long periods of time you may have some fails. We changed the recommended level -- the allowable levels remained the same -- to 64F to 81F. That means at the inlet of your server rack you can go to 81 degrees -- that's pretty warm. [The standard also sets recommendation on humidity levels as well.]”

    He also revealed that 81°F is a point where the power increase is minimal, because “raising it higher than that [the recommended limit] may end up diminishing returns for saving power at the whole data center level.” In fact, according to GSA, it can save about 4% to 5% in energy costs for each degree of increase in the server inlet temperature.

    Too much humidity will result in condensation, which leads to electrical shorts. According to GSA, “based on extensive reliability testing of Printed Circuit Board (PCB) laminate materials, it has been shown that conductive anodic filament (CAF) growth is strongly related to relative humidity. As humidity increases, time to failure rapidly decreases. Extended periods of relative humidity exceeding 60% can result in failures, especially given the reduced conductor to conductor spacing common in many designs today.” The upper moisture region is also important in protecting the disk and tape from corrosion. Excessive humidity forms monolayers of water on device surfaces, providing electrolyte for corrosion. On the other hand, too little humidity will leave the room electro-statistically charged.

    After the new standards were published, it would take time for the data centers to update their operating rooms. According to Schmidt, IBM started using the new guidelines internally since 2008, and some other data center probably would step it up two degrees at a time. To run near the new ASHRAE temperature limits means a higher risk environment for staff to manage and requires more operational expertise. According to 2013 Uptime Institute survey data, nearly half of all data centers reported that their systems ran at 71°F to 75°F. 37% of data center reported temperature from 65°F to 70°F, the next largest temperature segment. The trend to warmer data centers is better revealed by the fact that there were 7% data centers operating at 75°F or above, compared with 3% in the year before.

    Free IT Monitoring Guide


    References:

    ASHRAE, “2008 ASHRAE Environmental Guidelines for Datacom Equipment” http://tc99.ashraetcs.org/documents/ASHRAE_Extended_Environmental_Envelope_Final_Aug_1_2008.pdf

    Patrick Thibodeau, “It's getting warmer in some data centers”, 07/15/2013. http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9240803/It_s_getting_warmer_in_some_data_centers

    Patrick Thibodeau , “Q&A: The man who helped raise server operating temperatures”, 07/06/2009. http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9135139/Q_A_The_man_who_helped_raise_server_operating_temperatures_



    Written by:

    Ivory Wu, Sharp Semantic Scribe

    Traveling from Beijing to Massachusetts, Ivory recently graduated with a BA from Wellesley College in Sociology and Economics. Scholastic Ivory has also studied at NYU Stern School of Business as well as MIT. She joins Temperature@lert as the Sharp Semantic Scribe, where she creates weekly blog posts and assists with marketing team projects. When Ivory is not working on her posts and her studies, she enjoys cooking and eating sweets, traveling and couch surfing (12 countries and counting), and fencing (She was the Women's Foil Champion in Beijing at 15!). For this active blogger, Ivory's favorite temperature is 72°F because it's the perfect temperature for outdoor jogging.

    Chris Monaco Temperature@lert

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  • Temperature@lert December CELL Device Deal

    Happy Holidays to All! 

    Holiday CELL Deal*: 

    Purchase the Temperature@lert Cellular Edition and receive a FREE 6ft combination temperature/humidity sensor. This deal is valid December 16, 2013 through December 31, 2013. Keep watch on our social media accounts for more offers and coupons throughout the month of December. Please call 866-524-3540 If you have any questions or concerns about any holiday promotions.

     

    To Get the Discount:

    1. Add Cellular Edition + 6' Temperature/Humidity Sensor (AC-TMPHRJ1216) to your shopping cart

    2. Use the PROMO code: 6FTTH4CELL

    *offer valid on MSRP pricing only


    Temperature@lert December 2013 Deals & Sales


    LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/temperature-lert

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TemperatureAlert

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/TempAlertHarry

    Holiday WiFi Deal is Ending December 15!

    Purchase the Temperature@lert WiFi edition with Temperature@lert Sensor Cloud and receive FREE FedEx 2-Day Shipping. This deal is valid through December 15, 2013. Keep watch on our social media accounts for more offers and coupons throughout the month of December. Please call 866-524-3540 If you have any questions or concerns about any holiday promotions.

     

    To Get the Discount:

    1. Add WiFi + Sensor Cloud to your shopping cart

    2. In 'Shipping Method' Select "FedEx 2 Day"

    3. Use the PROMO code: 2DAYWIFICLOUD



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  • An Infographic for Everyday Food Storage

    This robust infographic came across our radar today, and we're glad to pass along the mashup of everyday food storagepractices for the benefit of restaurant owners, commercial refrigeration folk, and homeowners.



    The Shelf Life of Food infographic by LindsaySnowOsborn.


    Infographics (much like a research study, informative piece, or expose for example) are only as accurate and useful as the provided sources for the information. This infographic uses excellent sources for everyday food storage, such as the USDA, FDA, and the Natural Resources Defense Council. A handful of active interweb discussions are crying foul on a few of the details that are embedded in the chart. Since these are everyday food items, we should recognize the homeowners, chefs, and individual organizations as other sources of insight to support these findings.


    In particular, the eggs have garnered a bit of controversy. Readers and viewers from social media have claimed that "eggs do not spoil within a few hours" when stored in a pantry. In all, this mainly depends on the temperature configuration for the pantry. In a cooled, 'refrigerated' pantry, eggs can last for several weeks. However, eggs are tricky because of their sensitivity to humidity and higher temperatures. If eggs are sold refrigerated (as in most supermarkets), any exposure to higher temperatures can be problematic. We'll quote EggSafety.org as a reference point,

    "Maintaining a consistent, cool temperature is critical to safety. After eggs are refrigerated, it is important that they stay that way. A cold egg left out at room temperature can sweat, facilitating the growth of bacteria. Refrigerated eggs should not be left out more than two hours."

    And in regard to the 3-4 week storage in a refrigerated environment,

    "As long are they are kept refrigerated at 45 °F or lower, fresh shell eggs are safe to be consumed four to five weeks beyond the carton’s Julian date. Egg cartons with the USDA grademark must display a “Julian date,”* the date the eggs were packed. The Julian date is usually found on the short side of the carton and represents the consecutive days of the year with the number 001 as January 1 and December 31 as 365. Although not required, cartons may also carry an expiration date (EXP) beyond which the eggs should not be sold, but are still safe to eat. On cartons with the USDA grademark, this date cannot exceed 30 days after the eggs were packed in the carton. Depending on the retailer, the expiration date may be less than 30 days. Eggs packed in cartons without the USDA grademark are governed by the laws of their states."


    It's clear that temperature control is a primary concern for everyday food storage, particularly with eggs. The overall sensitivity is higher than in most foods, and for commercial refrigeration purposes, egg-storage environments must be strictly monitored and supervised. If you have environments where eggs are stored, be sure to log temperatures (at least twice daily) through the use of a temperature monitoring device or sensor.

    We'd love to hear your own comments on the food storage chart based on your own experience or expertise. Remember, always dispute the undisputed.

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  • Consideration of High Temperature Ambient Environments and Free Cooling in Data Center Operation

    Driectly from the original post: http://www.datacenterpost.com/2013/01/consideration-of-high-temperature.html

     

    Temperature@lert

     David Ruede, VP Marketing at Temperature@lert, says:

    Techies love acronyms, and IT professionals are masters of the jargon. Where else would we find such gems as CRAC, PUE, SaaS, DCIM, VoIP and VPN among the scores if not hundreds of options for the next big idea?

    Why do we need these when The Free Dictionary lists 259 phrases alone for the acronym DC? (Link 1)  First, we love to speak in shorthand.  Time is always too short; things need to be done quickly.  Speaking in Acronym makes us an insider, the elite few who can feel the bits and petabytes flowing through the veins and arteries of the interconnected web of the virtual world.  And short of a Vulcan Mind Meld, acronyms save time, although one could argue that when used in meetings there may be a few who don’t really understand the meaning and because they don’t want to appear “stupid”, don’t ask.

    Many of these terms started off as marketing terms.  Why would we need CRAC when AC may be sufficient?  And why is PUE debated daily as to its true meaning in professional social media sites?  Every data center operator, supplier and professional looks to set themselves or their companies apart from the competition.  I’ll argue this is a good thing because it makes web searches easier – I don’t have to sort through hundreds of household air conditioners sold in retail outlets to find what I need for a data center, server or telecom room.

    Recently a new acronym has been making its way into the jargon.  HTA, High Temperature Ambient, has cropped up in several professional periodicals and online marketing pieces.  The phrase is used to describe the benefits of reduced energy consumption in data centers and other IT facilities that operate at what many consider higher than “normal” temperatures, say 30°C (86°F) for example.  Described in earlier pieces as high ambient temperature or high temperature in the ambient, the idea of running data centers at higher temperatures has gained prominence as a way to save electrical energy, a very costly piece of the data center’s operating budget.  Often used with terms like “free cooling” or “air side economizers”, the idea is that today’s servers have been specified to run at higher temperatures than those just a few years ago, so operating equipment at higher temperatures has no detrimental effect.

    In April 2012, Intel published a study of the potential energy savings in green data center maker Gitong’s modular data centers.  The Shanghai study showed an annual cost reduction of almost $33,000 per year, which is significant.

    Figures 1a, 1b: Tables showing before and after HTA results - Source: Intel Link 2

    While saving energy is a very desirable goal, data center, server and telecom room operators are well served to understand the underlying assumptions behind “turning up the heat and opening up the doors and windows”.  First, all of the equipment in an IT space comes with manuals, and the manuals specify operating conditions. Insuring all of the equipment in the ambient is able to run at elevated temperatures is highly recommended, particularly since older devices or appliances may be more prone to heat related performance degradation.  ASHRAE’s TC 9.9 2011 Thermal Guidelines for temperature and humidity control are a good reference as to where to start when designing or setting up an HVAC system. (Link 3)

    Second, while the HVAC systems in IT spaces are generally well designed and provide adequate airflow to the equipment, time has a way of changing things.  Profiling the temperature of the data center to see if any changes in operation or addition of equipment have created “hot spots” with sufficient resolution to insure each rack or piece of equipment is operating within specification can be done with existing equipment by moving temperature sensors to areas not normally monitored during the temperature mapping process.

    Third, changes in temperature can cause changes in relative humidity.  Continuous monitoring of not only temperature but relative humidity before and after raising the temperature is recommended to insure both of these critical parameters are within manufacturer’s specification.

    And if IT professionals decide to employ “free cooling” by figuratively “opening up the doors and windows”, they would be well advised to check ASHRAE’s TC 9.9 Gaseous and Particulate Contamination Guidelines for Data Centers and again their supplier manuals for specification compliance. (Link 4)

    Figure 2: Ambient Air Cooling Unit (Link 5)

    Much has been written about free cooling; a June 2012 article is a good example. (ref. Link 5)  Cooling may indeed be “free” and many can and do use free cooling combined with HTA to make significant reductions in their energy bills.  As in all good ideas, “first, do no harm” is a good motto.  IT professionals may be well served to verify and validate the assumptions against best practices as they apply to their sites before any significant changes in operation are made.

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  • Server Room is too Hot?

    Is your Server Room too hot?

    If you suspect so, then you've come to the right place. For those unfamiliar with the potential hazards that a "hot server room" can cause, pay close attention! A neglected server room, that is, one with inadequate monitoring and poor supervision, is a serious hazard for your business. Remember, much of your company infrastructure (from web applications or database servers) lives and breathes on your server racks.


    According to the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), when the server room cooling system fails, you have about 8 minutes before temperatures reach dangerous levels for equipment. Even if equipment isn't knocked offline from a temperature spike, exposure to extreme temperatures can seriously decrease 
    the life of the equipment if your server room is too hot.

    Be wary of the potential hazards of an unsupervised server room. Try explaining this picture to your C-Suite.


    Ouch! Next time you realize that "my server room is too hot", remember that pre-emptive methods and monitoring devices are your best resources. These best practices will outline an ideal monitoring strategy for your server room. 

     _____________________________________________________________________________

     

    Monitor Temperature:

    Keep a logic-based system to prevent overheating. For example, if temperatures rise above 24°C, then an automated cooling unit should activate to counteract the rising temperature. 

     

    Monitor Humidity:

    Ensure that the humidity within your server room is not too high or too low. Low humidity levels can increase the liklihood of Electrostatic Discharge (ESD). Significant voltage can build up between dry surfaces and cause catastrophic failure if the humidity is too low. By contrast, high humidity levels can translate to increased rust of equipment. Keep in mind: the following suggestions serve as a general rule of thumbBe sure to check equipment manuals for pre-specified instructions on humidity levels if you suspect that your server room is too hot.


    Potential Risks for 40% Humidity and Below

    -ESD (Electrostatic Discharge)

    -Malfunctioning Equipment (Due to short circuits) 

    ______________________________________________________________
     

    Potential Risks for 60% Humidity and Above

    -Monolayers of water on surfaces

    -Rusting

    -Disk Drive Wear (corrosion/friction of disk head)

     

     

    (General Recommendation for Temperature: 10°C -28°C)
    (Ideal Ambient Temperature: 20-21°C)

    (Humidity: Between 40-60%)

     

    Monitor your Monitor!

    You can't sit in the server room all day, and what about after hours? Do you know when your server farm is beginning to overheat? Can you always rely on the designated employee to monitor the room and alert you?

    How do you know if humidity levels are rising on Saturday night? (while you're at home) Will you then "hope" that your racks aren't rusted by Monday morning? Find yourself hoping that your server room isn't too hot?

    Don't hope, be prepared! The best deterrant to these obstacles is a robust monitoring system. Temperature@lert's combination humidity and temperature sensor pack an excellent punch for holistic monitoring of your server room, and will prolong the shelf-life of your server equipment.

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  • Essential Tech Check List: Building & Retrofitting Your Server Room

    Whether you're building a server room, adding on, or moving equipment there are many considerations to mull over. From the basics to alarm systems, it is important to ensure your server room is efficient and to protect your mission critical equipment. Previously in our blog, we have addressed the issues surrounding the microclimate present in your server room; however, it is critical to have an understanding of how a server room should be laid-out and managed. Use our check list as a guide for promoting security, efficiency, and productivity:

    Our Essential Tech Check List

    (1) Your Basics of Space

    • -Examine the layout of the space and how many units of space you have to work with.

    • -The walls (including ceiling) and doors should isolate the sounds that your equipment is creating.

    • -Check to see which way the door opens. There should also be no windows or other entry points other than the doors in the room.

    • -Consider the floor and whether your equipment will need raised flooring. Aim for anti-static floor finishing to prevent an unwanted static charge.

    • -Make sure there is enough clearance for racks and that they are stable enough to hold your equipment.

    • -Check for aisle clearance too, make sure your have enough room for exhaust to escape and not over-heat nearby equipment.

    • -Think about whether you need ladder racks, cabinets, shelves, patch panels, or rack mounts.

    • -Take into weight and size of each piece of equipment into consideration when designing the layout.


    (2) Keeping Your Cool

    • -Check and see what type if centralized cooling is available, whether an under the floor air distribution or an air duct system.

    • -If there is no centralized system available, get an air conditioner or cooling unit that is able to keep your equipment working productively while minimizing energy consumption and costs.

    • -If at all possible, fresh air vents are great and save on energy costs and consumption!

    • -Remove any and all radiators or other heating equipment currently present in the room. You don't need to add heat at all!

    • -Monitor your cooling system(s) to make sure it is working properly, especially when no one is there.

    • -Make sure your cooling units are not too close in proximity to your electrical equipment, think condensation and flooding. Do not place air conditioning units over your servers.

    • -Monitor the humidity to prevent static charge and electrical shorts.

    • -See if a chilled water system is in the budget or find something within the budget constraints to ensure that the hot air has somewhere to go.

     

    (3) Using Your Power

    • -Check to make sure that you have enough outlets to support power to all your equipment and not to overload them.

    • -Get backup power, preferably UPS to prevent data loss from power blinking or outages.

    • -Don't surpass the maximum electrical intensity per unit of space.

    • -Consider shut down capabilities of equipment (SNMP traps for example).

    • -Make sure your equipment is grounded.

    • -Monitor for power outages if you are not using back-up power systems.

    • -Monitor your back up power systems to make sure your mission critical equipment is not failing due to power loss.

     

    (4) Keeping Secure & Safe

    • -Have at least one phone present in the room in case of emergencies.

    • -Either check for a preexisting fire alarm system and install one if there isn't.

    • -Get a fire suppression system if there is not one there. Take into consideration of whether you will have a wet or dry suppression system and the effects that will have on your equipment. (Halon is a great choice!)

    • -Have reliable contacts to help resolve issues immediately, or form a system of escalation.

    • -Monitor for flooding, especially if this has happened historically in the past.

    • -Secure entrances/exits, this is expensive equipment with critical data, you don't want just anyone in there messing around!

     

    (5) Other Considerations

    • -Get the best cabling/wiring available within budget constraints. 

    • -Keep extra cabling/wiring around, because you never know when you may need it.

    • -Consider color coding wires/cables, a little more work now but definitely a time-saver in the future!

    • -Think about lighting: location & heat produced.

    • -If there is someone sharing the space, get them some earplugs! It's going to be loud in there with the equipment being used.

    • -Consider networking/phone lines being run in there and how much space you have left after that.

    • -Plan for future expansion or retrofitting (again).

    • -Leave the service loops in the ceilings.

    • -Label outlets.

    • -Get rid of dust, your equipment hates it!

    • -Check if you have a rodent/pest problem.

    • -Cover emergency shutoff switches so that it can't be accidentally triggered.

    • -Try to centralize the room in the building so that you can eliminate having to use more cabling/wiring than you need to.

    • -Meet OSHA and ASHRAE guidelines as well local codes.


    Is your server room or do you know of someone's server room that is not being monitored for temperature? Are you concerned with energy consumption, ability to monitor off-hours, and/or preventing mission critical equipment from failure? If you or know someone who is experiencing such issues, we want to hear form YOU!

    We will be giving away ONE FREE USB DEVICE per month to the server room with the most need! Valued at $129.99,Temperature@lert USB Edition is a low-cost, high-performance device that monitors the ambient temperature in your server room and alerts you via email when the temperature rises or falls outside your acceptable range.

    Please send a brief description, pictures, and/or videos to diane@temperaturealert.com for consideration! Our team will select one winner each month based on description and need, because we firmly believe that companies in every industry 


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  • It's Hot! It's Cold! Oh No... It's Your Fluctuating Server Room Temperature Again...

    We know that every room, especially a server room, has its own microclimate. Even sensors that are inches apart can read different values! Although similar applications might share the same temperature threshold range, every sensor placement location is unique. It sounds strange; that there would be such fluctuations in temperature within inches, but this happens because your server room has its own minature weather pattern!

    So how do you figure out the correct temperature range for monitoring your server room? Or where to place your sensor? As many conditions as there are for the actual ourdoor weather patterns, there are many variables for sensor placement and operational range because of the changing indoor microclimate.

    Essentially, in order to determine the right thresholds for your server room "environment", you need to acquire adequate baseline knowledge. This process is called "baselining", which involves monitoring your server room first to establish a history of normal conditions. Temperature is a significant threat to your equipment and in order to battle this, you need to discover and establish your server room's microclimate (i.e. baselining)!


    Baselining is basically achieved through studying the space of your server room while considering the components within it. Thic can be done to determine the proper ranges for both temperature and humiditySo what spots are the most critical for consideration when it comes to sensor placement?

    1. Hot Spots
    At the bare minimum, place at least one sensor in a central location in the room. Note: every room has its own mini weather pattern, and conditions from one part to another can vary based on what the room contains and where vents/returns are located. The simplest rule of thumb is that heat rises. So, the higher the sensor placement, the warmer the temperature

    2. Cooling Vent Locations
    Whether it is an air conditioner, economized cooler, or another chilling device, it will affect the sensor reading depending on proximity of the sensor to the vent. If you want to monitor whether your cooling unit may be going out at different times,place a sensor in the air duct and you can determine when the cooling unit is off. Placement of a sensor in close proximity to the cooling unit may cause the sensor to pick up cooling unit "cycles", sending you false alerts in the process.

    3. Exhausts
    Besides cooling vents, you need to also consider hot vents from server cabinets or compressors. Placing a sensor near or in between these areas is crucial as high temperatures can cause damage to hardware. The exhaust-based alerts will draw attention to the high temperatures within the servers, allowing you to prevent loss of hardware (and revenue!)

    4. Ancillary Humidification Systems
    These systems help control humidity. Too much humidity can cause condensation, which leads to electrical shorts. Not enough humidity causes one to have quite the mini-electrifying experience with static electricity at its peak. Place your humidity sensor in a location seperate from the ancillary humidification system in order to prevent the sensor from getting shorted and to avoid false humidity readings.

    By monitoring temperature and humidity, one can have early warning of any disasters looming in your server room. It is always better to prevent a disaster rather than mop up after it (speaking of, flood sensors are great too!). If you need assistance in determining the best practices and routines for your server room, please feel free to shoot me an email:diane@temperaturealert.com.

    Happy Monitoring!

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  • The Concerning Environmental Conditions in Your Server Room

    Scorching temperatures, flooding, and humid conditions all come together to form the perfect storm. However, this doesn't occur in just nature. This can also occur in your server room! Servers are expensive pieces of equipment and the last thing you want to have is a server meltdown.

    Last week we discussed how temperature plays a significant factor in maintaining the lifespan of your server. When monitoring your server room, you need to be aware of the various conditions from temperature to humidity to flooding. Reason being that any of these environmental hazards can seriously damage your servers.

    Power outages, air conditioner failures, water leaks, or high humidity can cause an array of problems. Together, these conditions can shutdown or even melt server room equipment. Flooding and high humidity can cause electrical shorts as well.

    Air conditioners and cooling units are neccesary to prevent your server room temperatures from reaching scorching temperatures. Nevertheless, power failure can happen to anyone. When the power fails, the cooling units stop cooling. Without fully-operational cooling units, server temperatures can reach catastrophic extremes. According to ASHRAE, you have about 15 minutes before a temperature problem arises, mostly due to the high rate of change. In summary, Proper cooling systems, air conditioning units, and solid monitoring practices are important for any server room.

    Tune in next week to learn more about how to effectively monitor your server room or learn more now from our free E-Book.

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  • What Can You Monitor with Temperature@lert?



    When deciding on a Temperature@lert solution, generally you would have something in mind for the application prior to purchase.  Of course we have our standard industries that require the use of our products; however, there are many imaginative ways consumers have thought up that have opened a new world of monitoring possibilities.  

    Here are some of the innovative uses that have been implemented:

    • R/V pet monitoring 
    • HVAC systems
    • Warehouses
    • Wine storage
    • Ovens 
    • BBQ Smokers
    • Cryogenic Freezers
    • Food Trucks
    • Reefer Trucks
    • Kennels
    • Police K9 vehicles
    • Water Tanks 
    • Ponds
    • Farms/Barns
    • Chicken Coops
    • Portable bio-pharmaceutical cooling units
    • Steam Pipes
    • Incubators
    • Boiler rooms
    • Crops
    • Greenhouses
    • Explosives
    • Vacation homes
    • Candy factories
    • Vacant commercial property
    • Boiler rooms
    • Crawl spaces
    • Outdoor Cooling Units
    • Saunas
    • Hot tubs

    Of course these applications would not be possible without our smart sensors:

    • Temperature
    • Humidity
    • Flood
    • Expanded Range Temperature
    • Tank Level
    • Pressure
    • Leaf Wetness
    • Soil Moisture
    • Wind Direction
    • WInd Speed
    • Rainfall
    • CO2
    • O2
    • Dry Contact
    • Stainless Steel Temperature
    • Wine Bottle Temperature

    With the implementation of our smart sensors, the possibilities are endless in discovering solutions for your monitoring needs.  If you need a solution for your monitoring we're here to help, just send us a quick quote request: Quote Inquiry. Or if you have an interesting way you use your device, we'd love to hear about it, email info@temperaturealert.com.


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  • Temperature@lert Integrates with Cacti

    Here at Temperature@lert, we really love integrations. So we were ecstatic to hear about a new one for Cacti from our Twitter follower @cturra. Cacti is an open-source, web-based network monitoring and graphing tool used as an industry-standard data logging tool RRDtool. @cturra developed it for WIFI users for both temperature and temperature/humidity monitoring.


    Of course we had to inquire about this because integrations really just open the possibilities of open source graphing for our WIFI users. So we reached out to Chris to find out more:

    "We had purchased a number of Temperature@lert WiFi Edition devices for each offices 'network closet' and in each cage in our data centers. We had an extensive Cacti setup for monitoring a number of services already, so it seemed like a logical location to collect and graph information about temperatures for each location. By integrating our Temperature@lert with Cacti we were able to use our standard alerting/reporting mechanisms. Plus, it was cool to watch and trend the graphs over time :) Attached is a snapshot of how the graphs look in Cacti."


     

    Want to monitor/graph your Temperature@lert WIFI device in Cacti? Check it out: https://github.com/cturra/temp-alert-cacti. Thanks Chris for the awesome integration and allowing us to share with our users! 

    Anyone else with integrations? Please contact us directly at info@temperaturealert.com because we'd love to hear about it! 


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