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  • Batteries, AC or PoE: So Many (Power) Choices, So Little Time

    Choosing the right WTM electrical power source for each organization often requires testing.


    The previous piece in this series takes a look at Wireless Temperature Monitoring (WTM) device configuration options as a prelude to helping understand and select the optimal power source option for each site. Because Temperature Monitoring systems can be both wired and wireless, it is important to understand both options exist.

    NYC Hospital Queens installed a WTM system to monitor medications and blood in hospital refrigerators, an effort that is featured on the website Pharmacy Purchasing & Products. (Link to PPP Article) To be fair the WTM system deployed was not 100% wireless. According to the author, the system uses wireless temperature sensors that communicate through a gateway to the hospital’s network. The wireless receivers used require 110 VAC electrical connections (household plugs). The 120 VAC powered receivers which can also be described as gateways would normally be plugged in, collect data wirelessly from the sensors and send the accumulated readings wirelessly to the hospital’s IT network.

    In the case of NYC Hospital Queens most receivers were installed above the ceiling tiles where there were no electrical outlets. In such cases the site would normally need to install electrical outlets which can add considerable expense to the project; this was the case for NYC Hospital Queens. In this case however, the receivers or gateways chosen had a second power option, PoE or Power Over Ethernet. In the PoE configuration the gateways are connected directly to the hospital’s IT network via LAN (Ethernet) cables. Not all devices can take advantage of this mode of operation and not all LAN installations are designed to provide PoE, but in this case the PoE option was the easiest and least costly to implement.



    Examples of network cameras showing non-PoE and two PoE configurations. (Link to Source)

    Among the electrical power options for WTM devices, AC power and PoE are generally considered the most reliable and available unless the site has a history of blackouts or brownouts. And sites like hospitals often have emergency generators that keep critical systems operating during power outages, so even utility outages may not pose a problem. Additionally, AC powered WTM devices can be connected to inexpensive Uninterruptable Power Supplies (UPSs) that allow the device to continue to operate when AC power is interrupted. In the UPS powered case, however, if the site’s IT network is down the WTM device may not be able to transmit its data. The UPS powered device is likely able to continue to monitor temperatures so that when communication is reestablished there will be a full data set for hospital policy and regulatory purposes.

    The alternative to AC or PoE is battery power, which needs to be assessed carefully to meet the site’s expectations and specifications. Cell phone technology has made many if not most readers of this piece aware how significant an issue battery life can be as related to wireless devices. Battery powered sensors will need recharging or battery replacement. The frequency of recharging or replacement will be determined by two factors: (1) wireless transmitter power (largely related to range or overcoming interference from walls, furnshings, equipment, etc.); (2) temperature sampling/data transmission rate (largely related to site policies or regulatory requirements). Needless to say, no organization would willingly take on a device that requires frequent battery changes, say each month or each calendar quarter) to maintain quality records.


    Battery life vs. data transmission demonstrates that higher sensor data sampling and transmission rates will result in lower battery life. (Link to Source)

    When selecting battery operated sensors for WTM systems a thorough understanding of the temperature sampling requirements is needed to determine sampling rate and transmission frequency to meet regulatory or hospital policy needs. In general five (5) minute sampling is sufficient to help insure temperature sensitive medications and materials are not exposed to temperature that can degrade product safety or efficacy. When refrigerator doors are left open for a few minutes medication vials, for example, do not become overly warm. Only after ten to fifteen minutes or longer in the case of larger quantities of material will the materials in the vials begin to be exposed to harmful temperatures. With five (5) minute sampling an alert will be sent at the next five minute interval, letting hospital staff know temperature excursions have been seen and the refrigerator unit needs to be checked.

    Whether or not AC, PoE, battery or a combination of these electrical power sources meets site’s needs, specifications and expectations will take time and effort to determine. An evaluation of any WTM device to determine if it provides sufficient transmission range, sampling and reporting rate, temperature alert level(s), and response times to meet specifications and expectations is strongly recommended before committing to any particular supplier.

    Temperature@ert’s WiFi, Cellular and ZPoint product offerings linked to the company’s Sensor Cloud platform provides a cost effective solution for organizations of all sizes. The products and services can help bring a laboratory or medical practice into compliance with minimum training or effort. For information about Temperature@lert visit our website at http://www.temperaturealert.com/ or call us at +1-866-524-3540.



    Written By:

    Dave Ruede, Well-Versed Wordsmith

    Dave Ruede, a dyed in the wool Connecticut Yankee, has been involved with high tech companies for the past three decades. His background in chemistry and experience in a multitude of industries such as industrial chemicals and systems, pulp and paper, semiconductor fabrication, data centers, and test and assembly facilities informs his work daily. Well-versed in sales, marketing, management, and business development, Dave brings real world experience to Temperature@lert. When not crafting new Temperature@lert projects, Dave enjoys spending time with his young granddaughter, who keeps him grounded to the simple joys in life. Such joys for this wordsmith include reading prize winning fiction and non-fiction. Although a Connecticut Yankee, living for a decade in coastal California’s not too hot, not too cold climate epitomizes Dave’s favorite temperature, 75°F.

    Temperature@lert Dave Ruede

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  • Electrical Power Options for Wireless Temperature Monitoring Devices

    Understanding WTM device configuration options is a beginning.


    Unless one uses a thermometer to monitor temperature, electrical power is needed to power today’s temperature monitoring devices. And there are several choices for electrical power options as will be described below. One factor in determining what electrical power source is best for any particular site is the Wireless Temperature Monitoring system configuration, and there are several to consider each with its own costs and benefits.

    This seventh piece in our series series is prompted by an article on the Pharmacy Purchasing & Products website describing the use of Wireless Temperature Monitoring (WTM) systems to monitor medication temperatures in hospital refrigerators. (Link to PPP Article) The Pharmacy Purchasing and Products posting titled NYC Hospital Examines WTM (Wireless Temperature Monitoring) Options notes there are several factors to consider in understanding which device will work best to help protect the safety and efficacy of temperature sensitive medicines and products such as vaccines and blood.

    Although the supplier of the WTM system selected by NYC Hospital Queens was not identified, the author did provide some insight into the system design and configuration. “Initially, we opted to use wireless sensors with powered (120 volts) receivers. However, it quickly became clear that maintaining access to a power supply would be a challenge because most receivers are located above the ceiling where access to a 120 volt power supply is limited and requires the additional services and expense of an electrician. Our engineering department estimated that there would be a significant cost associated with transferring data from the sensor to the receiver. Thus, the powered receivers were swapped for receivers that worked with our Ethernet network, which resulted in significant cost savings.”

    In NYC Hospital Queens the issue of power became a significant consideration to help determine the types of devices installed. But what are the choices. Taking a step back, temperature monitoring systems can be designed in several ways. Here are some common wired and wireless examples.

         1. USB device (Wired) - plugs directly into computer or server USB port, powered by USB port

         2. LAN (Ethernet, Category 5, Cat 5, Cat 5e) device (Wired) - requires Ethernet cable to connect to the site’s IT network,        powered by AC or PoE (Power over Ethernet)

         3. WiFi Standalone device - wirelessly connected to the site’s existing WiFi network, AC or Battery powered

         4. LAN Gateway** device (AC or PoE) with wired or wireless* satellite sensors (AC or Battery)

         5. WiFi Gateway** device (AC or Battery) with wired or wireless* satellite sensors (AC or Battery)

         6. Proprietary Wireless Gateway** device (AC or Battery) with wired or wireless* satellite sensors (AC or Battery)

         7. GSM, CDMA, or LTE Cellular Standalone device (AC or Battery) with wired sensors

         8. GSM, CDMA, or LTE Cellular Gateway** device (AC or Battery) with wired or wireless satellite sensors (AC or Battery)

    *Wireless satellite sensors can employ WiFi, ZigBee, Bluetooth, RFID, Proprietary or other wireless communication technologies. The two previous pieces in this series discuss these options as they relate to monitoring hospital medical refrigerators.

    **Gateway describes the wireless sensor interface to the site IT network.

    Graphic showing possible components of WTM devices.

    Graphic showing possible components of WTM devices.

    Selection of the type of sensor, interface and data collection device will have a significant impact on the type of electrical power required to operate the system without continuous maintenance. Other configurations may exist but these configurations are representative of those found in today’s market.

    For example, below are four Temperature@lert temperature monitoring devices for consideration. From left to right, the Z-Point wireless sensor operates on AA Li-Ion batteries for up to five (5) years with five (5) minute monitoring intervals; the Cellular Edition normally operates on AC power (110/220 VAC) and has backup battery power for times when electrical power is interrupted’ The USB device is powered through the USB port of a computer or server, and the WiFi device requires 110/120 VAC electrical power or Power-Over-Ethernet through the device's LAN connector to operate.

    Temperature@lert Z-Point Wireless sensor, Cellular Edition Gateway, USB Edition, and WiFi Edition temperature monitoring devices.


    Left-to-Right: Temperature@lert Z-Point Wireless sensor, Cellular Edition Gateway, USB Edition, and WiFi Edition temperature monitoring devices.


    Facility operations, conditions and requirements will help determine whether or if AC or battery power meets the site’s specifications and needs. In the case of NYC Hospital Queens, AC power was not available for the sensor gateways but Ethernet (LAN) connections were available. Ethernet (LAN) connectors can be configured to deliver power to devices connected to them; the technology is called Power Over Ethernet (PoE), and this was a more cost-effective choice for the hospital's installation. What is the impact of the choice on operation of the WTM system. The next piece in this series will examine the pluses and minuses of different electrical power options and provide some insight into best practices.

    Temperature@ert’s WiFi, Cellular and ZPoint product offerings linked to the company’s Sensor Cloud platform provides a cost effective solution for organizations of all sizes. The products and services can help bring a laboratory or medical practice into compliance with minimum training or effort. For information about Temperature@lert visit our website at http://www.temperaturealert.com/ or call us at +1-866-524-3540.



    Written By:

    Dave Ruede, Well-Versed Wordsmith

    Dave Ruede, a dyed in the wool Connecticut Yankee, has been involved with high tech companies for the past three decades. His background in chemistry and experience in a multitude of industries such as industrial chemicals and systems, pulp and paper, semiconductor fabrication, data centers, and test and assembly facilities informs his work daily. Well-versed in sales, marketing, management, and business development, Dave brings real world experience to Temperature@lert. When not crafting new Temperature@lert projects, Dave enjoys spending time with his young granddaughter, who keeps him grounded to the simple joys in life. Such joys for this wordsmith include reading prize winning fiction and non-fiction. Although a Connecticut Yankee, living for a decade in coastal California’s not too hot, not too cold climate epitomizes Dave’s favorite temperature, 75°F.

    Temperature@lert Dave Ruede

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  • Wireless Technology Choices for Temperature Monitoring Sensors - Part 2

    WTM device claims about Transmission Range need closer scrutiny.

    Part 1 of this title examined data rate factors in selecting Wireless Temperature Monitor devices from the graphic below. Essentially, data rate is not ever a factor since the monitoring interval for medical refrigeration WTM devices is in the order of minutes and produces very small amounts of data. The only time data rate could be a factor is if the refrigerator is monitored every second or less and a number of additional parameters was being transmitted, however even this would not be a factor in many cases since, again, the amount of data is small. There may be a case where rate is a factor if, for example, high definition video transmission was added to the data. Since such systems when in use are generally part of the facility’s security systems, data rate should not be concern when evaluating WTM devices for hospital refrigeration monitoring.


    Comparison of range vs. peak data rate for wireless communication technologies used in Wireless Temperature Monitoring (WTM) devices. (Link to Source)

    Range, unlike data rate is a factor that needs to be understood when making a WTM system selection. This is for several reasons. First, wireless technology included a wireless transmitter and the transmitted data needs to be able to reach the corresponding wireless receiver, either the facility’s wireless network or a dedicated device provided by the supplier. In some cases where several wireless temperature sensors are communicating with a single receiver, even more care is needed to insure robust communication.

    Another factor inherent in range but not generally acknowledged is interference from the facility itself. Factors such as walls, medical or infrastructure equipment, furniture and file cabinets and in cases where the WTM device is entirely inside the refrigerator, the refrigerator itself. Claims about range are almost always based on optimal conditions: line of sight in air. Qualifiers that the WTM device’s range may vary depending on interference from objects in the immediate vicinity are offered. (Full disclosure: Temperature@lert offers both a Line of Sight and Indoor/Urban specification for its wireless devices.) These are reasonable qualifiers.

    The table below provides another view of the presentation in the graphic above. In the Range row wireless options are generally noted as a range, 10 to 100 meters in the case of WiFi, for example. Those who use WiFi networks and portable devices in their homes or work can attest to the variability of signal strength as they move away from the WiFi router (transmitter/receiver) or move into an area that is heavily furnished or shielded by a number of walls between the portable device and the WiFi router.


    Comparison of Wireless Networking Technologies used in WTM Systems. (Link to Source)

    Because range is such an important but difficult to absolutely specify parameter when choosing a wireless temperature monitor experimentation with a test device from the WTM supplier is recommended. A single device is usually sufficient since it can be moved around the facility to determine the suitability in different locations and under different conditions. Recording the results for a few minutes at each location is all that is needed since the signal is either there or not there, and the data stream is either coherent or not. Again, experience with home WiFi networks are instructive.

    The next piece in this series will examine a WTM device parameter closely tied to data rate and range, power source type and the effects on performance.

    Temperature@ert’s WiFi, Cellular and ZPoint product offerings linked to the company’s Sensor Cloud platform provides a cost effective solution for organizations of all sizes. The products and services can help bring a laboratory or medical practice into compliance with minimum training or effort. For information about Temperature@lert visit our website at http://www.temperaturealert.com/ or call us at +1-866-524-3540.


    Free Temperature@lert eBook



    Written By:

    Dave Ruede, Well-Versed Wordsmith

    Dave Ruede, a dyed in the wool Connecticut Yankee, has been involved with high tech companies for the past three decades. His background in chemistry and experience in a multitude of industries such as industrial chemicals and systems, pulp and paper, semiconductor fabrication, data centers, and test and assembly facilities informs his work daily. Well-versed in sales, marketing, management, and business development, Dave brings real world experience to Temperature@lert. When not crafting new Temperature@lert projects, Dave enjoys spending time with his young granddaughter, who keeps him grounded to the simple joys in life. Such joys for this wordsmith include reading prize winning fiction and non-fiction. Although a Connecticut Yankee, living for a decade in coastal California’s not too hot, not too cold climate epitomizes Dave’s favorite temperature, 75°F.

    Temperature@lert Dave Ruede

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  • Wireless Technology Choices for Temperature Monitoring Sensors - Part 1

    You don’t need to be a geek or nerd to make the right wireless choice for refrigeration monitors.

    As seen in the previous piece in this series titled NYC Hospital Examines WTM (Wireless Temperature Monitoring) Options, there are several factors to consider in understanding which device will work best to help protect the safety and efficacy of temperature sensitive medicines such as vaccines. Among the ones explored were battery or AC power (or both!) and the use of sensor buffer vials.

    The heart of WTM sensors is the wireless technology itself. Wireless sensors can be easier to install since they do not need to be connected to the site’s IT network via LAN cables. Those that operate solely on battery powered can be easily placed anywhere, some would claim, although that is not exactly true and comes to the heart of the matter: WTM devices are like Kryptonite confronting lead, they cannot penetrate everything. And those limitations are dictated by the wireless technology embedded in the device. So a look at the offerings and some words about their suitability under various circumstances is called for.


    Comparison of range vs. peak data rate for wireless communication technologies used in Wireless Temperature Monitoring (WTM) devices. (Link to Source)

    Peak data rate is one of the factors for wireless communications. For WTM devices peak data rate is almost never an issue. Unlike computers, tablets and smartphones that are uploading or downloading megabytes of data very quickly, temperature readings contain very little data (temperature, date, time, device ID, etc.), a few to several bytes for each reading. And because refrigeration monitoring almost never requires continuous monitoring, every second for example, the number of transmissions is small. This is because of two factors. First, WTM devices that report and send alarm or alerting messages if the temperature changes from one second to the next will invariably send out dozens if not hundreds of alerts that are non actionable, a refrigerator door is left open for 30 to 60 seconds for example. Medications in the refrigerator are not at risk when this happens. They are at risk if the temperature rises above the alert level and stays there for several minutes. This is one reason buffer vials are used, to dampen out momentary temperature spikes that are not meaningful.

    Medical refrigerator with door open for several seconds or even a minute does not generally put medications at risk. Using a sensor buffer vial can give better insight to temperatures of medications during excursions. (Link to Image Source)

    WTM devices are typically set to read and transmit the temperature every few minutes, 2 to 5 minutes for example and in some cases every 10 to 15 minutes. At one site a large medical freezer is monitored every 15 minutes because the staff knows that with the door closed they have up to six hours to recover or move sensitive materials to another unit without exceeding temperature limits. Each hospital will need to experiment with monitoring intervals and temperature limit settings to find the right balance between too much and too little. This generally happens quickly, especially if very tight limits and frequent monitoring is chosen in the start. Getting dozens of notifications when staff is searching for a medication or several door openings occur within a relatively short time will help find the balance to insure medication safety and efficacy.

    The next piece in this series will explore the range portion of the graphic.

    Temperature@ert’s WiFi, Cellular and ZPoint product offerings linked to the company’s Sensor Cloud platform provides a cost effective solution for organizations of all sizes. The products and services can help bring a laboratory or medical practice into compliance with minimum training or effort. For information about Temperature@lert’s Cellular and SensorCloud offerings, visit our website at http://www.temperaturealert.com/ or call us at +1-866-524-3540.

    free Temperature@lert eBook



    Written By:

    Dave Ruede, Well-Versed Wordsmith

    Dave Ruede, a dyed in the wool Connecticut Yankee, has been involved with high tech companies for the past three decades. His background in chemistry and experience in a multitude of industries such as industrial chemicals and systems, pulp and paper, semiconductor fabrication, data centers, and test and assembly facilities informs his work daily. Well-versed in sales, marketing, management, and business development, Dave brings real world experience to Temperature@lert. When not crafting new Temperature@lert projects, Dave enjoys spending time with his young granddaughter, who keeps him grounded to the simple joys in life. Such joys for this wordsmith include reading prize winning fiction and non-fiction. Although a Connecticut Yankee, living for a decade in coastal California’s not too hot, not too cold climate epitomizes Dave’s favorite temperature, 75°F.

    Temperature@lert Dave Ruede

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  • NYC Hospital Examines WTM Options

    Wireless Temperature Monitoring systems can vary greatly in design, technology, ease of use.

    This third piece of the series examining New York Hospital Queens’ experience with Wireless Temperature Monitoring systems as reported on the Pharmacy Purchasing and Products website article, we look at the options considered and some that were not . (Link to PPP Article)

    Once medication, blood and nutrition products refrigeration was evaluated and found lacking prompting a replacement of dorm style units with over 100 medical grade refrigeration in patient care areas, the next step was to examine WTM options for evaluation. According to author Alexander F. Melchert, , MS, RPh, the Director of Pharmacy at the hospital, “Several WTM systems were evaluated culminating in the adoption of one that best suited our needs.

    The hospital selected a device that utilizes wireless sensors connected to probes immersed in a bottle of ethylene glycol as ideal for their needs. The ethylene glycol bottle is used as a buffer to reduce temperature fluctuations that can result in false alerts. (Note: Liquid ethylene glycol and propylene glycol are commonly used in laboratory and food applications, dry sand or glass beads are options that eliminates the potential for liquid spills.) The temperature sensor is immersed into the bottle which is then capped and placed into the refrigerator. Two other factors noted were cost and the ability to self-install, meaning hospital personnel could perform all of the tasks to place the sensors and get them operating correctly, not a small consideration when dealing with new and potentially complicated technology.

    Temperature buffer vial comparison: Air, dry sand, and propylene glycol shows damping effects of each. Damping is useful to manage momentary temperature changes that are not significant to the product’s efficacy, safety or quality. (Link to Source)

    Dry or liquid media filled buffer vial with temperature sensor installed helps reduce temperature fluctuations due to medical refrigerator door opening and the possible triggering of alarms or alerts that do not compromise the medication.(Link to Source)

    The Pharmacy Purchasing and Products article’s author describes other aspect of the experience. “The WTM system was phased in over a one-year period. Once an area was integrated into the electronic process we discontinued the use of manual logs, with the exception of situations where network downtime exceeded 12 hours. In addition, because these refrigerators and freezers are designed for hospital use, they typically include ports or access points for inserting the temperature sensors, easing the installation process.

    WTM devices can take many forms and use many different technologies. The devices may be battery powered, have internal batteries for backup during power outages, or be powered by the sites electrical power. Which type of power one selects is dependent on whether or not the device is required to be operating when the sites electrical power goes down or, in the case of sites with emergency generators, how long the backup power can operate. Sites that require temperature monitoring regardless of external power sources will want to choose WTM systems that can operate on internal batteries for several days if not longer. Such devices will also need internal data logging and downloading for times when network connects are interrupted.

    A second key factor to consider is the wireless communication technology. Several options exist including WiFi, Bluetooth, RFID, ZigBee, WLAN, WiMax, NFC plus mobile communication technologies such as GSM, CDMA and LTE. The choices can be daunting since each wireless technology comes with its strengths and weaknesses. Wireless technology options will be explored in the next piece in this series. The good news is the user need not be an expert on the technology options. One does have to be clear on the requirements or scope of work, and once that happens the best option or options will rise to the top.

    Wireless sensor communication technologies comparing data rate and range (Link to Source)

    Temperature@ert’s WiFi, Cellular and ZPoint product offerings linked to the company’s Sensor Cloud platform provides a cost effective solution for organizations of all sizes. The products and services can help bring a laboratory or medical practice into compliance with minimum training or effort. For information about Temperature@lert’s Cellular and SensorCloud offerings, visit our website at http://www.temperaturealert.com/ or call us at +1-866-524-3540.

    Free Vaccine Monitoring Guide


    Written By:

    Dave Ruede, Well-Versed Wordsmith

    Dave Ruede, a dyed in the wool Connecticut Yankee, has been involved with high tech companies for the past three decades. His background in chemistry and experience in a multitude of industries such as industrial chemicals and systems, pulp and paper, semiconductor fabrication, data centers, and test and assembly facilities informs his work daily. Well-versed in sales, marketing, management, and business development, Dave brings real world experience to Temperature@lert. When not crafting new Temperature@lert projects, Dave enjoys spending time with his young granddaughter, who keeps him grounded to the simple joys in life. Such joys for this wordsmith include reading prize winning fiction and non-fiction. Although a Connecticut Yankee, living for a decade in coastal California’s not too hot, not too cold climate epitomizes Dave’s favorite temperature, 75°F.

    Temperature@lert Dave Ruede

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  • 2014 FDA Food Safety Predictions and the Role of Temperature Monitoring

    Steps to automate temperature recording and reporting help meet key food safety concerns.


    A recent blog on the Food Safety Tech website featured predictions by former Chief Medical Officer at the US FDA Food Safety and Inspection Service Dr. David Acheson. The piece presents five prediction for 2014 Food Safety.  Link to Blog With his insight into the workings of the FDA, Dr, Acheson offers a first look at likely FDA actions in 2014.  These include:

         1. FSMA Final & Proposed Rules will be pushed for completion

         2. Poultry Modernization Act Pressure to reduce high levels of bacteria on raw chicken

         3. More Recalls

         4. More calls for GMO & Nano labeling

         5 Other - expanded focus on front of package labeling and more stringent requirements on heavy metals (lead, cadmium), especially in imported foods.


    Due to the publicity that food safety problems garner, many of the issues above are key in the minds of consumers, and therefore need to be considered seriously.  For example, an October 2013 Los Angeles Times editorial titled Keeping Salmonella out of Chicken made headlines when the piece pointed out that Sweden has virtually eliminated salmonella in store bought chicken and that a 2010 Consumers Union study found no salmonella in the organic store-brands chicken tested (Link to Editorial). The editorial's note that one particular outbreak was from antibiotic resistant strains and led to a call for tighter regulation and reduced antibiotic use.   The industry’s response that thorough cooking will kill the bacteria does little to stem the adverse publicity and potential liability from such outbreaks.  Dr. Acheson ties such events to his prediction for more recalls in 2014.


    December 2013 CDC Salmonella Heidelberg Contaminated Chicken Case Count (CDC Link)


    Certainly producers of chicken as well as other meat, fish, dairy and produce can improve their operations to reduce such outbreaks.  The question is whether or not they will take the initiative to show proactive approaches to reducing bacterial contamination or weather another storm of headlines accompanied by a drop in consumer purchases of suspect problems and the resultant lawsuits that always follow.  The FDA is looking at this issue closely and proactive measures can help in arriving at practices and regulations that meet both consumer and producer needs.

    One such proactive approach for the poultry industry is to monitor breeding area temperatures to insure the animals are kept at temperatures that promote health and reduce bacterial growth.  Temperature@lert’s WiFi and Cellular Edition devices have been deployed in numerous breeding houses with good results.  While temperature controls take care of cooling and heating needs they are not infallible; these systems can and do fail.  And if temperatures climb too high on hot, humid days, all the fans in the world will not be enough to keep the poultry safe.  Temperature@lert’s devices alert growers to the dangers before they cause serious harm by sending email, text and voice messages to managers when problems arise.

     


    Chicken Farm (Link to National Geographic); Processing Plant (Link to Pine Manor Farms)


    Quick responses can be the difference between sick or injured birds and healthy ones at medium and  large commercial chicken grower sites.  Keeping temperatures from reaching extremes can help prevent rapid bacterial growth.  Likewise, processing plants are at risk of contamination when temperatures rise promoting the growth of bacteria.  This is why major chicken growers have deployed Temperature@lert’s Cellular Edition alerting devices coupled with secure cloud based data collection, storage and alert reporting offers a fault tolerant solution for times when site power or HVAC systems are malfunctioning.  Temperature@lert’s proprietary Sensor Cloud can send text, voice and phone alerts to insure responsible personnel are aware of problems when they occur, day or night, holidays or weekends, and growers can get a good nights sleep because they know their chickens are safe.


    Temperature@lert ZPoint Cellular DeviceTemperature@lert ZPoint Wireless Sensor

    Cellular Edition (Left) and optional ZPoint Wireless Network Sensor Module (Right)


    Temperature@ert’s WiFi, Cellular and ZPoint product offerings linked to the company’s Sensor Cloud platform provides a cost effective solution for organizations of all sizes. The products and services can help bring a laboratory or medical practice into compliance with minimum training or effort. For information about Temperature@lert’s Cellular and SensorCloud offerings, visit our website at http://www.temperaturealert.com/ or call us at +1-866-524-3540.


    Free Temperature@lert eBook




    Dave Ruede, Well-Versed Wordsmith

    Dave Ruede, a dyed in the wool Connecticut Yankee, has been involved with high tech companies for the past three decades. His background in chemistry and experience in a multitude of industries such as industrial chemicals and systems, pulp and paper, semiconductor fabrication, data centers, and test and assembly facilities informs his work daily. Well-versed in sales, marketing, management, and business development, Dave brings real world experience to Temperature@lert. When not crafting new Temperature@lert projects, Dave enjoys spending time with his young granddaughter, who keeps him grounded to the simple joys in life. Such joys for this wordsmith include reading prize winning fiction and non-fiction. Although a Connecticut Yankee, living for a decade in coastal California’s not too hot, not too cold climate epitomizes Dave’s favorite temperature, 75°F.

    Temperature@lert Dave Ruede

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  • [Live Webinar] Set-Up and Q&A For Temperature@lert WIFI330 Tomorrow


    Are you new to the WIFI330 or have questions about your WIFI330? If so, join Temperature@lert's WIFI330 Troubleshooting Webinar on February 18th at 1pm EST via Google Hangouts: http://talrt.co/tempalertwifiwebinar. Our support specialist Dan Garnett will lead the discussion and live Q&A. The webinar will span 60 minutes and will include the following talking points:


    - Setting Up Your WIFI330
    - Troubleshooting
    - Connecting to Sensor Cloud
    - Live Q&A
    For more information regarding this webinar, please contact support@temperaturealert.com for additional details. 
     

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  • Temperature@lert's December WIFI Deal Begins Today!

    Happy Holidays to All! 

    Holiday WiFi Deal*: 

    Purchase the Temperature@lert WiFi edition with Temperature@lert Sensor Cloud and receive FREE FedEx 2-Day Shipping. This deal is valid through December 15, 2013. Keep watch on our social media accounts for more offers and coupons throughout the month of December. Please call 866-524-3540 If you have any questions or concerns about any holiday promotions.

     

    To Get the Discount:

    1. Add WiFi + Sensor Cloud to your shopping cart

    2. In 'Shipping Method' Select "FedEx 2 Day"

    3. Use the PROMO code: 2DAYWIFICLOUD

    *offer valid on MSRP pricing only


    Temperature@lert WIFI330 + Sensor Cloud Deal Free 2-Day Shipping


    LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/temperature-lert

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TemperatureAlert

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/TempAlertHarry



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  • Temperature Alert: Notification Sender Change for Sensor Cloud

    SERVICE UPDATE:

    Notification Sender Change for Sensor Cloud Customers

     

    For Temperature@lert customers on sensor cloud, the notification "sender" address will change on May 20, 2013 (Monday).

    • Previously, alerts and notifications were sent from: "support@temperaturealert.com".

    • Going forward, all notifications will be sent from: "notify@myalertlist.com".

    OLD FORMAT:




    This change will take effect in the coming days. Be sure to update your spam folders, address books, and firewalls to prevent bounceback and to ensure prompt delivery of alert notifications. Please contact Temperature@lert with any questions or concerns in regard to this change. 

    NEW FORMAT:


    Please email support@temperaturealert.com if you have any questions!


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  • USB Version 4.2.1 and WiFi Version 7.3 Released

    USB Software Release 4.2.1


    Changes:

    • Fixed a few installation issues with Windows Server 2008

    • Interface accelaration

    • Base filtering engine fix

     

    How to download and re-install the latest software and drivers

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    1) Uninstall the software and delete the program files\temperature@lert folder.

    2) Uninstall the drivers (Download the driver cleaning utility from our downloads section)

    3) Unzip the files

    4) Run CDMUninstaller.gui by right clicking and choosing "run as administrator" (or just run if that option is not displayed) - no need to change any settings.

    5) Click "Add" and then "Remove Drivers"

    4) Download the latest updates here

    5) Start Software and click "rescan" on the settings tab.

    6) Click save and apply.

    With the most recent updates of Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 and related platforms, you may need to run the driver uninstaller again, and unplug and plug the device back in, and let the OS automatically detect drivers. 

     

    WiFi Firmware Release 4.2.1


    Changes log:

     

    7.3

    • New sensor reading firmware

    7.2

    • Fixes bug with the alarm email page not saving settings between reboots

    7.1

    • Fixed bug with preferences page not saving settings correctly
    • Minor updates to status emails

    7.0

    • Initial Release
     

    Flashing Instructions

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    1. Log into your Temperature@lert TM-WiFi 330 unit

    2. Navigate to the "Help" Tab

    3. Click "Upgrade Firmware"

    4. Follow the prompts, and select the tm-wifi-330-7-1.bin file

    5. The update should take approximately three minutes total. Do not power off

    your device during the update, as that may render the device non-functional. 


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