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  • Dawn of Solar Data Centers?


    Major player projects can point to readiness, costs and benefits of solar power for data centers.


    Water, water everywhere,

    And all the boards did shrink.

    Water, water everywhere,

    Nor any drop to drink.                The Rime of the Ancient Mariner - Samuel Taylor Coleridge


    Data center managers must feel a lot like Coleridge’s Ancient Mariner when they look out the window (assuming their offices have any windows). Like the sailors on Coleridge’s journey, data center professionals are surrounded by free power from the wind, sun, water,the earth’s heat and biofuel, but none of it is usable as it exists to power the insatiable demands of the equipment inside the vessel. Despite this challenge, there have been several interesting projects regarding green energy sources. This piece in the data center energy series will explore solar photovoltaic to help determine if the technology is suitable to provide cost effective, reliable power to data centers.


    Temperature@lert Blog: Dawn of Solar Data Centers?
    Left: Engraving by Gustave Doré for an 1876 edition of the poem. "The Albatross," depicts 17 sailors on the deck of a wooden ship facing an albatross. Right: A statue of the Ancient Mariner, with the albatross around his neck, at Watchet, Somerset in south west England where the poem was written. (Link to Source - Wikipedia)


    Solar powered data centers have been in the news recently primarily due to projects by Apple and Google. In an effort to build green data center, Apple’s Maiden, North Carolina 500,000 sq.ft. site is powered in part by a nearby 20-acre, 20-megawatt (MW) solar array, The site also has a 10-MW fuel cell array that uses “directed biogas” credits as the energy source. (Link to Apple Source) The remainder of the power needed for the site is purchased from the local utility with Apple buying renewable energy credits to offset the largely coal and nuclear generated Duke Energy electricity. Apple sells the power from the fuel cells to the local utility in the form of Renewable Energy Credits used to pay electric utility bills. Apple expects that the combination of solar photovoltaic panels and biogas fuel cells will allow the Maiden data center to use 100% renewable energy or energy credits by the end of the year. Several lesser known companies have also implemented solar initiatives but the news is not so widespread.


    Temperature@lert Blog: Dawn of Solar Data Centers?
    Left: Apple Maiden, NC data center site shows solar array in green (Link to Source - Apple); Right: Aerial photo of site with solar array in foreground (Link to Source - Apple Insider)


    It will be instructive to follow reports from Apple to determine the cost-effectiveness of the company’s green approach. That being said, many if not most companies do not have the luxury of being able to build a 20-acre solar farm next to the data center. And most have neither the cash to invest in such projects nor the corporate caché of Apple to get such projects approved, so initiatives such as Maiden may be few and far between. Still, there’s a lot of desert land ripe for solar farms in the US Southwest. Telecommunication infrastructure may be one limitation, but California buys a lot of its electrical power from neighboring states so anything is possible.

    What about solar power for sites where the data center is built in more developed areas, is there any hope? Colocation provider Lifeline Data Centers announced their existing 60,000 sq. ft. Indianapolis, Indiana site will be “largely powered by solar energy”. (Link to Source - Data Center Dynamics) Author Mark Monroe’s piece titled Solar Data Center NOT “Largely Solar Powered” thought about his solar panel installation and took a at the numbers behind this claim. Lifeline is planning to install a 4-MW utility-grade solar array on the roof and in campus parking lot by mid-2014. Author Monroe takes a swag at determining how much of the data center’s power needs will be filled by the solar array.

    Assuming the site’s PUE is equal to the Uptime Institute’s average of 1.64 and taking into account the photovoltaic array’s operating characteristics (tilt angle, non-tracking), site factors (sun angle, cloud cover), etc., Monroe calculates that 4.7% of the site’s total energy and 12% of the overhead energy will be available from the solar installation. At an industry leading PUE of 1.1, the installation will provide 7% of the total energy and 77% of the overhead energy. Monroe notes that while these numbers are a step in the right direction, Lighthouse’s claim of a data center “largely powered by solar energy” is largely not based on the facts. His piece notes that even Apple’s Maiden site with 20 acres of panels only generates about 60% of the total energy needed by the site overhead and IT gear. Lifeline would need to add and extra 6-MW of solar capacity and operate at a PUE of 1.2 to operate at Net Zero Overhead.

    I am curious to see hard data from these and other solar photovoltaic projects for data centers that will show hard cost, performance data and financial incentives (tax considerations, power contracts, etc.) that the industry can review to determine if solar is the right approach for their electrical power needs. Although such disclosure is unlikely due to competitive considerations, it would greatly assist the industry to help promote such green initiatives to help take the spotlight off of headlines criticizing the “power hungry monster”.

    All efforts to improve industry efficiency and reduce energy consumption are steps in the right direction. Companies like Lighthouse Data Centers that don’t have the deep pockets of Apple or Google are taking steps toward the goal of Net Zero Overhead. The challenge for data center operators that initiate green energy or efficiency based projects will be to boast about these efforts to make headline grabbing claims that may not be well supported by the data. As Launcelot Gobbo tells Old Gobbo in Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice, “but at any length truth will out.” Green powered and energy independent are claims that need to be examined carefully to maintain industry credibility and good will or “truth will out.”

    Temperature@lert FREE IT Monitoring Guide

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  • Temperature@lert Named as Finalist in 2013 American Business Awards

    TEMPERATURE@LERT NAMED AS FINALIST IN 2013 AMERICAN BUSINESS AWARDS


    The 11th annual Stevie® Awards will be presented on June 17 in Chicago and September 16 in San Francisco.

    Boston, MA – May 9, 2013 – Temperature@lert, a leading provider of real-time, cloud-based environmental monitoringsolutions designed to enable businesses to mitigate temperature-related disasters, was named a Finalist today in the New Product or Service of the Year – Software category in The 2013 American Business Awards for their Sensor Cloud service. Temperature@lert will ultimately be a Gold, Silver, or Bronze Stevie® Award winner in the program.

     

    Sensor Cloud is a web-based Software-as-a-Service product for monitoring the environmental conditions of server rooms, bio-pharma vaccine storages, and commercial refrigerators while providing regulatory compliance data logging and alerting for various environmental sensors such as temperature, humidity, water, and more. The fault-tolerant design helps ensure that sensor data is logged and maintained for years, while the website and free iPhone/Android apps enable access to sensor readings and the ability to edit phone calls, emails, and SMS alerts from anywhere.

     

    Temperature@lert’s Cellular Products have previously won several awards, including a Stevie Gold Award for their Solar Cellular Edition in 2012. However, it is Temperature@lert’s Sensor Cloud that serves as the brains of all Cellular Editions with over thousands of devices deployed and running the service. Temperature@lert's WIFI and USB devices can also be connected to Sensor Cloud for a consolidated view of all sensor readings and alert statuses. Temperature@lert’s mission is to create a cost-effective and fault-tolerant system that will allow any user to monitor their assets at any moment, anywhere.

     

    The American Business Awards are the nation’s premier business awards program. All organizations operating in the U.S.A. are eligible to submit nominations – public and private, for-profit and non-profit, large and small. 

     

    The American Business Awards will be presented at two awards events: the ABA's traditional banquet on Monday, June 17 – in Chicago for the first time, after 10 years in New York; and the new product & technology awards event on Monday, September 16 in San Francisco.

     

    More than 3,200 nominations from organizations of all sizes and in virtually every industry were submitted this year for consideration in a wide range of categories, including Most Innovative Company of the Year, Management Team of the Year, Best New Product or Service of the Year, Corporate Social Responsibility Program of the Year, and Executive of the Year, among others.  Temperature@lert is nominated in the New Product or Service of the Year – Software category for their Sensor Cloud service.

     

    “Temperature@lert’s Sensor Cloud service directly addresses every industry’s monitoring needs ranging from server rooms, to farms, to medical storage, and even to commercial food transportation operations. We are deeply honored to be recognized as a finalist for our Sensor Cloud service by the American Business Awards,” said Harry Schechter, CEO/President of Temperature@lert. “This honor only further validates the need for remote temperature monitoringbecause everyone should be able to easily prevent temperature related disasters, regardless of type of industry or size of company. We believe in giving you a solution before you even have a problem.”

     

    Finalists were chosen by more than 140 business professionals nationwide during preliminary judging in April and May.  More than 150 members of nine specialized judging committees will determine Stevie Award placements from among the Finalists during final judging, to take place May 13 - 24.  

     

    Details about The American Business Awards and the list of Finalists in all categories are available at www.StevieAwards.com/ABA.   

     


    About Temperature@lert

    Temperature@lert’s temperature and environmental monitoring solutions provide both real-time and historic views of a location’s temperature and other critical parameters through alerts and cloud-based graphs, data logs and reports. This information allows customers to immediately react to potentially disastrous temperature or other fluctuations in critical environments, as well as provide temperature consistency for regulatory and internal process control requirements. Temperature@lert has more than 40,000 devices installed in over 50 countries around the globe. For more information, please visit www.temperaturealert.com.

     

    About the Stevie Awards

    Stevie Awards are conferred in four programs: The American Business Awards, The International Business Awards, the Stevie Awards for Women in Business, and the Stevie Awards for Sales & Customer Service.  A fifth program, the Asia-Pacific Stevie Awards, will debut this year.  Honoring organizations of all types and sizes and the people behind them, the Stevies recognize outstanding performances in the workplace worldwide.  Learn more about the Stevie Awards at www.StevieAwards.com.

     

    Sponsors and partners of The 2013 American Business Awards include the Business TalkRadio Network, Callidus Software, Citrix Online, Dynamic Research Corporation, Experian, John Hancock Funds, LifeLock, PetRays, and SoftPro.

     

    ###

     

    Contact:

    Diane Deng

    Temperature@lert

    866-524-3540 x506


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  • TEMPERATURE@LERT RECOGNIZED BY COMPUTERWORLD AS A 2013 COMPUTERWORLD HONORS LAUREATE

    BOSTON, MA—March 19, 2013— IDG’s Computerworld Honors Program today announces Temperature@lert as a 2013 Laureate. The annual award program honors visionary applications of information technology and promoters of positive social, economic and educational change.

    “Technology continues to play a pivotal role in transforming how business and society functions. For the past 25 years the Computerworld Honors Program has had the privilege of celebrating innovative IT achievements,” said John Amato, vice president & publisher, Computerworld. “Computerworld is honored to recognize the outstanding accomplishments of the 2013 class of Laureates and to share their work. These projects demonstrate how IT can advance organizations' ability to compete, innovate, communicate and prosper.”

     

    Approximately 100% farmers over-water their crops and plants.  The vast majority (90%) of water use by farmers in the United States is for irrigation. This causes significant water waste, runoff, and wasted dollars. The agricultural industry is a major player for ground and surface water usage, which accounts for about 80% of the water consumption in the United States. Therefore, a solar cellular environmental monitoring device saves water and therefore, also saves fuel and dollars while promoting crop growth.

     

    By discovering the correct amount of water to use, a farmer can cut costs, spending, and reduce their strain on the water system. Their unit can save enough water in a year for up to 9,000 people. This assumes a 200-acre farm, 6.21 gal water/cu ft on farm per year, 50% water reduction, and 50 gallons per day of water use per person.


    Harry Schechter, President and CEO of Temperature@lert. “Historically, our Cellular Edition has found its way into the agricultural markets through our traditional channels. After all who wouldn’t want to help save water and promote food growth? These are very important matters in sustainability and we’re glad to be a part of the solution, and we’re ecstatic for the opportunity to help save our country’s valuable fresh water resources as well as promote crop growth as a Computerworld Honors Laureate.”

     

    The Computerworld Honors Program awards will be presented at the Gala Evening and Awards Ceremony on June 3, 2013 at the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington, D.C.

     

    About The Computerworld Honors Program

    Founded by International Data Group (IDG) in 1988, The Computerworld Honors Program is governed by the not-for-profit Computerworld Information Technology Awards Foundation. Computerworld Honors is the longest running global program to honor individuals and organizations that use information technology to promote positive social, economic and educational change. Additional information about the program and a Global Archive of past-Laureate case studies, as well as oral histories of Leadership Award recipients can be found at the Computerworld Honors website.

     

    About Temperature@lert

    Temperature@lert’s temperature and environmental monitoring solutions provide both real-time and historic views of a location’s temperature and other critical parameters through alerts and cloud-based graphs, data logs, and reports. This information allows customers to immediately react to potentially disastrous temperature fluctuations or other changes in critical environments, as well as provide temperature consistency for regulatory and internal process control requirements. Temperature@lert has more than 40,000 devices installed in over 50 countries around the globe. For more information, please visit http://www.temperaturealert.com.

     

    About Computerworld

    Computerworld is the leading source of technology news and information for IT influencers, providing peer perspective, IT leadership and business results. Computerworld’s award-winning website (http://www.computerworld.com/), bi-weekly publication, focused conference series, custom solutions and custom research forms the hub of the world’s largest (40+ edition) global IT media network and provides opportunities for IT solutions providers to engage this audience. Computerworld leads the industry with an online audience of over 3.5 million unique, monthly visitors (Omniture, August 2012) and was recognized as the Best Website by ASBPE and TABPI in 2012. Computerworld is published by IDG Enterprise, a subsidiary of International Data Group (IDG), the world’s leading media, events and research company. Company information is available at http://www.idgenterprise.com/.

     

    Note: All product and company names are trademarks of their respective companies.


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  • Temperature@lert Named a 2013 Winner of Boston Business Journal's Best Green Practices Award for Invention

    Temperature@lert has been selected as a winner of the Boston Business Journal’s “Best Green Practices Awards” for invention. The Boston Business Journal honors many companies for accomplishments in design, innovation, invention, and for other notable strides in green practices.  Temperature@lert will be honored for their accomplishment for invention at a breakfast at The Seaport Hotel on Friday, April 12, 2013.

    Temperature@lert’s TM-CELL540-S solar powered, cellular sensing and alerting system combines Temperature@lert’s latest generation cellular engine with a host of agricultural related sensors and control devices.  By using Temperature@lert’s industrial smart sensors, agriculturalists now have the ability to use technology to effectively monitor and ensure proper crop growth, as well as save water. For example, if an action is taken, such as turning on sprinklers to prevent frost from damaging crops, customers will receive emails, SMS text messages, and phone calls to inform them of the status change.

    Close to 100% of farmers in the United States over-water their crops and plants.  The vast majority (90%) primarily use water for irrigation purposes. These two percentages paint a grim picture of water waste, runoff, and wasted dollars for the agricultural community. The agricultural industry is a major player for ground and surface water usage, accounting for about 80% of the water consumption in the United States.

    Their solar cellular environmental monitoring device saves water, and as a byproduct, also saves fuel and maintenance dollars. By discovering the correct amount of water to use, a farmer cannot only cut costs and spending but he/she can prevent over-watering and reduce their individual strain on the water system. The Solar Cellular Unit can save enough water in a year for up to 9,000 people. This assumes a 200-acre farm, 6.21 gal water/cu ft on farm per year, 50% water reduction, and 50 gallons per day of water use per person.

    Publisher of the Boston Business Journal, Chris McIntosh, said it best, “Our Best Green Practices event is a celebration of the environmentally aware and intelligent approaches that increasingly define Boston business.” With such an innovative group of green practices winners for 2013, Temperature@lert looks forward to meeting the other winners and sharing a deeper insight into green practices performed and showcased in Boston.

    “Temperature@lert is greatly honored to be recognized for its Solar Cellular Edition in green practices by the Boston Business Journal. We are ecstatic to be working within the agricultural industry, where we get to help growers with their crops while saving water one of our nation’s valuable resources,” said Temperature@lert’s President and CEO, Harry Schechter. “Who wouldn’t want to help save water and promote food growth? These are very important matters in sustainability and we’re glad to be a part of the solution.”

    For more information on Temperature@lert’s Solar Cellular Edition, please visit http://www.temperaturealert.com/Wireless-Temperature-Store/Temperature-Alert-Solar-Cellular-Sensor.aspx.


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  • Essential Tech Check List: Building & Retrofitting Your Server Room

    Whether you're building a server room, adding on, or moving equipment there are many considerations to mull over. From the basics to alarm systems, it is important to ensure your server room is efficient and to protect your mission critical equipment. Previously in our blog, we have addressed the issues surrounding the microclimate present in your server room; however, it is critical to have an understanding of how a server room should be laid-out and managed. Use our check list as a guide for promoting security, efficiency, and productivity:

    Our Essential Tech Check List

    (1) Your Basics of Space

    • -Examine the layout of the space and how many units of space you have to work with.

    • -The walls (including ceiling) and doors should isolate the sounds that your equipment is creating.

    • -Check to see which way the door opens. There should also be no windows or other entry points other than the doors in the room.

    • -Consider the floor and whether your equipment will need raised flooring. Aim for anti-static floor finishing to prevent an unwanted static charge.

    • -Make sure there is enough clearance for racks and that they are stable enough to hold your equipment.

    • -Check for aisle clearance too, make sure your have enough room for exhaust to escape and not over-heat nearby equipment.

    • -Think about whether you need ladder racks, cabinets, shelves, patch panels, or rack mounts.

    • -Take into weight and size of each piece of equipment into consideration when designing the layout.


    (2) Keeping Your Cool

    • -Check and see what type if centralized cooling is available, whether an under the floor air distribution or an air duct system.

    • -If there is no centralized system available, get an air conditioner or cooling unit that is able to keep your equipment working productively while minimizing energy consumption and costs.

    • -If at all possible, fresh air vents are great and save on energy costs and consumption!

    • -Remove any and all radiators or other heating equipment currently present in the room. You don't need to add heat at all!

    • -Monitor your cooling system(s) to make sure it is working properly, especially when no one is there.

    • -Make sure your cooling units are not too close in proximity to your electrical equipment, think condensation and flooding. Do not place air conditioning units over your servers.

    • -Monitor the humidity to prevent static charge and electrical shorts.

    • -See if a chilled water system is in the budget or find something within the budget constraints to ensure that the hot air has somewhere to go.

     

    (3) Using Your Power

    • -Check to make sure that you have enough outlets to support power to all your equipment and not to overload them.

    • -Get backup power, preferably UPS to prevent data loss from power blinking or outages.

    • -Don't surpass the maximum electrical intensity per unit of space.

    • -Consider shut down capabilities of equipment (SNMP traps for example).

    • -Make sure your equipment is grounded.

    • -Monitor for power outages if you are not using back-up power systems.

    • -Monitor your back up power systems to make sure your mission critical equipment is not failing due to power loss.

     

    (4) Keeping Secure & Safe

    • -Have at least one phone present in the room in case of emergencies.

    • -Either check for a preexisting fire alarm system and install one if there isn't.

    • -Get a fire suppression system if there is not one there. Take into consideration of whether you will have a wet or dry suppression system and the effects that will have on your equipment. (Halon is a great choice!)

    • -Have reliable contacts to help resolve issues immediately, or form a system of escalation.

    • -Monitor for flooding, especially if this has happened historically in the past.

    • -Secure entrances/exits, this is expensive equipment with critical data, you don't want just anyone in there messing around!

     

    (5) Other Considerations

    • -Get the best cabling/wiring available within budget constraints. 

    • -Keep extra cabling/wiring around, because you never know when you may need it.

    • -Consider color coding wires/cables, a little more work now but definitely a time-saver in the future!

    • -Think about lighting: location & heat produced.

    • -If there is someone sharing the space, get them some earplugs! It's going to be loud in there with the equipment being used.

    • -Consider networking/phone lines being run in there and how much space you have left after that.

    • -Plan for future expansion or retrofitting (again).

    • -Leave the service loops in the ceilings.

    • -Label outlets.

    • -Get rid of dust, your equipment hates it!

    • -Check if you have a rodent/pest problem.

    • -Cover emergency shutoff switches so that it can't be accidentally triggered.

    • -Try to centralize the room in the building so that you can eliminate having to use more cabling/wiring than you need to.

    • -Meet OSHA and ASHRAE guidelines as well local codes.


    Is your server room or do you know of someone's server room that is not being monitored for temperature? Are you concerned with energy consumption, ability to monitor off-hours, and/or preventing mission critical equipment from failure? If you or know someone who is experiencing such issues, we want to hear form YOU!

    We will be giving away ONE FREE USB DEVICE per month to the server room with the most need! Valued at $129.99,Temperature@lert USB Edition is a low-cost, high-performance device that monitors the ambient temperature in your server room and alerts you via email when the temperature rises or falls outside your acceptable range.

    Please send a brief description, pictures, and/or videos to diane@temperaturealert.com for consideration! Our team will select one winner each month based on description and need, because we firmly believe that companies in every industry 


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  • Top 3 Reasons to Monitor Your Server Room / Data Center

    It's 2013, a new year with a smaller budget and of course a higher expectancy for better equipment efficiency. In order to have this higher level of efficiency while meeting budget constraints, you would need to essentially extend the lifespan of your equipment. Expanding the lifespan requires a monitoring system that would ensure your equipment is operating in an acceptable range of environmental conditions. Here are our Top 3 Reasons to Monitor Your Server Room / Data Center:

     

    (1) Protect Your Mission Critical equipment from Failure

    The humming of servers is generally a good indicator that equipment is working diligently. However with the increase in productivity, comes an increase in temperature created by your efficient equipment. Although ASHRAE did increase the temperature envelope to 80.6°F for data centers, many still try to push the envelope in order to promote higher efficiency while trying to lower energy costs and usage. To achieve this, you would need to use less coolers and chillers yet still run equipment at a high rate of productivity; such as Google's Data Center in Belgium, which has been deemed Google's most efficicent data center.

    Innovative approaches to running your server and other technical equipment at a higher temperature have greatly improved productivity levels while lowering energy costs. However not every company has the budget for the latest in server room and data center technology. Less technologically innovative servers that try to run at higher productivity in hotter climates can fail, resulting in damaged or melting equipment as well as data loss, not to mention unhappy IT people crammed into that hot room as well.


    (2) Inability to Physically & Personally Monitor After Hours

    In the IT realm, servers are most certainly mission critical; however, servers are rarely viewed as a life or death matter. Considering how much data and information has been collected and stored, these pieces of equipment surely serve an important purpose to all. After all, technology is the backbone supporting a company's operations nowadays.

    Just like a human cannot function at high efficiency without a healthy spine, it is very difficult for a company to function productively without technology in such a tech-savvy timeBut since servers are not often seen as mission critical by ones outside the IT realm, there is a lack of a budget for monitoring these servers. Often overlooked and forgotten, there is rarely a person designated to monitor after hours when IT staff have left for the day. This often leaves these pieces of mission critical equipment unmonitored, resulting in not only informational loss but financial loss as well: During 2009, an estimated $50 million to $100 million losses occurred due to environmental issues going unmonitored!


    (3) Be Green Friendly: Lower Energy & Costs

    With decreased budgets presented and increased efficiency expected along with meeting green and sustainability initiatives, IT staff are forced to make due. This means working in hotter enviornments in order to run machines at full productivity levels while not over-using the air conditioning, cooler, chiller or HVAC systems. Even Google's Data Center in Beligum uses only fresh air to cool off the equipment. Despite the risks of high temperature, many must make these choices in order to meet departmental changes.

    By at least monitoring temperature, you can help extend the lifespans of your servers. Considering the fact that running them at higher temperatures is a must, making sure your servers are not working in too hot of an environment is therefore crucial. At some point, the envelope will be pushed to such an extent that equipment will malfunction and even melt. By efficiently limiting use of cooling & HVAC systems, you would save in costs and lower energy consumption while still protecting your mission critical equipment. By using temperature monitoring equipment with SNMP traps, you would even be able to program in a shut down mode for your equipment if the temperature threshold has been breached.

    By taking the initiative to meet all the new requirements ranging from budget to sustainability by doing temperature monitoring, you will be able to prevent disaster instead of having to clean up melted server. Learn more from our FREE E-Book on Temperature Monitoring:

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  • It's Hot! It's Cold! Oh No... It's Your Fluctuating Server Room Temperature Again...

    We know that every room, especially a server room, has its own microclimate. Even sensors that are inches apart can read different values! Although similar applications might share the same temperature threshold range, every sensor placement location is unique. It sounds strange; that there would be such fluctuations in temperature within inches, but this happens because your server room has its own minature weather pattern!

    So how do you figure out the correct temperature range for monitoring your server room? Or where to place your sensor? As many conditions as there are for the actual ourdoor weather patterns, there are many variables for sensor placement and operational range because of the changing indoor microclimate.

    Essentially, in order to determine the right thresholds for your server room "environment", you need to acquire adequate baseline knowledge. This process is called "baselining", which involves monitoring your server room first to establish a history of normal conditions. Temperature is a significant threat to your equipment and in order to battle this, you need to discover and establish your server room's microclimate (i.e. baselining)!


    Baselining is basically achieved through studying the space of your server room while considering the components within it. Thic can be done to determine the proper ranges for both temperature and humiditySo what spots are the most critical for consideration when it comes to sensor placement?

    1. Hot Spots
    At the bare minimum, place at least one sensor in a central location in the room. Note: every room has its own mini weather pattern, and conditions from one part to another can vary based on what the room contains and where vents/returns are located. The simplest rule of thumb is that heat rises. So, the higher the sensor placement, the warmer the temperature

    2. Cooling Vent Locations
    Whether it is an air conditioner, economized cooler, or another chilling device, it will affect the sensor reading depending on proximity of the sensor to the vent. If you want to monitor whether your cooling unit may be going out at different times,place a sensor in the air duct and you can determine when the cooling unit is off. Placement of a sensor in close proximity to the cooling unit may cause the sensor to pick up cooling unit "cycles", sending you false alerts in the process.

    3. Exhausts
    Besides cooling vents, you need to also consider hot vents from server cabinets or compressors. Placing a sensor near or in between these areas is crucial as high temperatures can cause damage to hardware. The exhaust-based alerts will draw attention to the high temperatures within the servers, allowing you to prevent loss of hardware (and revenue!)

    4. Ancillary Humidification Systems
    These systems help control humidity. Too much humidity can cause condensation, which leads to electrical shorts. Not enough humidity causes one to have quite the mini-electrifying experience with static electricity at its peak. Place your humidity sensor in a location seperate from the ancillary humidification system in order to prevent the sensor from getting shorted and to avoid false humidity readings.

    By monitoring temperature and humidity, one can have early warning of any disasters looming in your server room. It is always better to prevent a disaster rather than mop up after it (speaking of, flood sensors are great too!). If you need assistance in determining the best practices and routines for your server room, please feel free to shoot me an email:diane@temperaturealert.com.

    Happy Monitoring!

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  • What Can You Monitor with Temperature@lert?



    When deciding on a Temperature@lert solution, generally you would have something in mind for the application prior to purchase.  Of course we have our standard industries that require the use of our products; however, there are many imaginative ways consumers have thought up that have opened a new world of monitoring possibilities.  

    Here are some of the innovative uses that have been implemented:

    • R/V pet monitoring 
    • HVAC systems
    • Warehouses
    • Wine storage
    • Ovens 
    • BBQ Smokers
    • Cryogenic Freezers
    • Food Trucks
    • Reefer Trucks
    • Kennels
    • Police K9 vehicles
    • Water Tanks 
    • Ponds
    • Farms/Barns
    • Chicken Coops
    • Portable bio-pharmaceutical cooling units
    • Steam Pipes
    • Incubators
    • Boiler rooms
    • Crops
    • Greenhouses
    • Explosives
    • Vacation homes
    • Candy factories
    • Vacant commercial property
    • Boiler rooms
    • Crawl spaces
    • Outdoor Cooling Units
    • Saunas
    • Hot tubs

    Of course these applications would not be possible without our smart sensors:

    • Temperature
    • Humidity
    • Flood
    • Expanded Range Temperature
    • Tank Level
    • Pressure
    • Leaf Wetness
    • Soil Moisture
    • Wind Direction
    • WInd Speed
    • Rainfall
    • CO2
    • O2
    • Dry Contact
    • Stainless Steel Temperature
    • Wine Bottle Temperature

    With the implementation of our smart sensors, the possibilities are endless in discovering solutions for your monitoring needs.  If you need a solution for your monitoring we're here to help, just send us a quick quote request: Quote Inquiry. Or if you have an interesting way you use your device, we'd love to hear about it, email info@temperaturealert.com.


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  • The awards just keep coming! Michelle Keefe finalist in Stevie Award competition

    We're on a roll: BBJ 40 over 40, Finalist in MassChallenge competition, 2011 Connected World Entrepreneur Award, the list just keeps growing.  And now we've learned our own Michelle Keefe, Temperature@lert's Sustainability Seer, our collective environmental conscience is a finalist for the 2011 Stevie Award for the small business category.  Stay tuned for the results! And Michelle, Congratulations! and take time for it to sink in that you're very special among the 1300 deserving entrants for this year's awards.  See our full press release about the announcement here:  Link to Press Release

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